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HEPA Research Digest: September 2014

posted Aug 30, 2014, 7:27 AM by Ben Jane   [ updated Aug 30, 2014, 7:30 AM ]
Each month I will review a range of journals, articles and research papers from the previous month. I will include those that I think are relevant to students and professionals interested in the area of Health, Exercise and Physical Activity (HEPA). Content is largely based on peer-reviewed findings but will also include links to blogs and videos that have come to my attention in the previous month. If you think you have seen something that might be of interest then please let me know at bjane@marjon.ac.uk or @benjanefitness.

 

Physical Activity and Health


Westgarth, C., Christley, R. M., & Christian, H. E. (2014). How might we increase physical activity through dog walking?: A comprehensive review of dog walking correlates. International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 11(1), 83. http://www.ijbnpa.org/content/pdf/1479-5868-11-83.pdf

“There is good evidence that the strength of the dog-owner relationship, through a sense of obligation to walk the dog, and the perceived support and motivation a dog provides for walking, is strongly associated with increased walking. The perceived exercise requirements of the dog may also be a modifiable point for intervention. In addition, access to suitable walking areas with dog supportive features that fulfil dog needs such as off-leash exercise, and that also encourage human social interaction, may be incentivising.”

 

Flint, E., Cummins, S., & Sacker, A. (2014). Associations between active commuting, body fat, and body mass index: population based, cross sectional study in the United Kingdom. BMJ, 349, g4887.[fulltext]

“Results from multivariate linear regression analyses suggest that, compared with using private transport, commuting by public or active transport modes was significantly and independently predictive of lower BMI for both men and women. In fully adjusted models, men who commuted via public or active modes had BMI scores 1.10 (95% CI 0.53 to 1.67) and 0.97 (0.40 to 1.55) points lower, respectively, than those who used private transport. Women who commuted via public or active modes had BMI scores 0.72 (0.06 to 1.37) and 0.87 (0.36 to 0.87) points lower, respectively, than those using private transport. Results for percentage body fat were similar in terms of magnitude, significance, and direction of effects.

Men and women who commuted to work by active and public modes of transport had significantly lower BMI and percentage body fat than their counterparts who used private transport. These associations were not attenuated by adjustment for a range of hypothesised confounding factors”

 

BHFNC physical activity and health update [aug 2014]

British Medical Journal a link to the latest edition can be found here

The Lancet a link to the latest edition can be found here

JAMA a link to the latest edition can be found here

Health Education Research a link to the latest edition can be found here

International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition & Physical Activity a link to the latest edition can be found here

BMC Public Health a link to the latest edition can be found here

 

Health Psychology

 

Health Psychology Review a link to the latest edition can be found here

Psycho-oncology a link to the latest edition can be found here

 

Cancer and Physical Activity

Kampshoff, C. S., Jansen, F., van Mechelen, W., May, A. M., Brug, J., Chinapaw, M. J., & Buffart, L. M. (2014). Determinants of exercise adherence and maintenance among cancer survivors: a systematic review. International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 11(1), 80. [full text]

“18 studies were included. There was moderate evidence for a positive association between exercise history and exercise adherence. Inconsistent findings were found for age, gender and education as well as for psychological factors such as stage of change, perceived behavioral control, self-efficacy, extraversion, attitude, intention, fatigue, and quality of life, and physical factors including cardiovascular fitness, body mass index, and baseline physical activity.

Exercise history is positively associated with exercise adherence. Future trials should further study the influence of social and environmental determinants on exercise adherence and maintenance in addition to demographic, psychological and physical determinants.”

 

Journal of Cancer Survivorship a link to the latest edition can be found here

 

Low Back Pain and Physical Activity

 

Nutrition & Weight Management

Wang, X., Ouyang, Y., Liu, J., Zhu, M., Zhao, G., Bao, W., & Hu, F. B. (2014). Fruit and vegetable consumption and mortality from all causes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer: systematic review and dose-response meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies. BMJ, 349, g4490. [full text]

16 prospective cohort studies were  included in this meta-analysis. During follow-up periods ranging from 4.6 to 26 years there were 56 423 deaths (11 512 from cardiovascular disease and 16 817 from cancer) among 833 234 participants. Higher consumption of fruit and vegetables was significantly associated with a lower risk of all cause mortality. Pooled hazard ratios of all cause mortality were 0.95 (95% confidence interval 0.92 to 0.98) for an increment of one serving a day of fruit and vegetables (P=0.001), 0.94 (0.90 to 0.98) for fruit (P=0.002), and 0.95 (0.92 to 0.99) for vegetables (P=0.006). There was a threshold around five servings of fruit and vegetables a day, after which the risk of all cause mortality did not reduce further. A significant inverse association was observed for cardiovascular mortality (hazard ratio for each additional serving a day of fruit and vegetables 0.96, 95% confidence interval 0.92 to 0.99), while higher consumption of fruit and vegetables was not appreciably associated with risk of cancer mortality.

 

Journal of Obesity a link to the latest edition can be found here

 

Sport Science and Strength & Conditioning

Martuscello, J. M., Nuzzo, J. L., Ashley, C. D., Campbell, B. I., Orriola, J. J., & Mayer, J. M. (2013). Systematic review of core muscle activity during physical fitness exercisesThe Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research27(6), 1684-1698. [full text]

 

Turner, A. N., & Stewart, P. F. (2014). Strength and Conditioning for Soccer Players. Strength & Conditioning Journal, 36(4), 1-13. [fulltext]

In this review, the authors introduce some of the key findings regarding a number of conditioning methods and give guidance on how to condition soccer players.

 

A podcast by www.youarenotsosmart.com David Epstein on Practice [listen here]

 

Sports Medicine a link to the latest edition can be found here

Physical Therapy a link to the latest edition can be found here

British Journal of Sports Medicine a link to the latest edition can be found here

International Journal of Exercise Science a link to the latest edition can be found here

Journal of Sports Sciences a link to the latest edition can be found here

The Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research a link to the latest edition can be found here

Strength & Conditioning Journal a link to the latest edition can be found here

 

Research methods 

Via a browse of Ben Goldacre’s site I found this great link …Testing treatments Website

 

 

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